Employment Law Archives - Goldenleaver
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  At last - something that's NOT about Brexit:  the Gender Pay Gap Regulations It's time to stop ignoring what private sector organisations with 250 or more staff must do after the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017 come into force on 6th April 2017. Although the fact of a gender pay gap may not be rocket science, what's interesting is that the gender pay gap isn't a one-way gap.  Apparently it falls to about 9% for full time employees;...

BREXIT - more about the labourers than the law? Like it or not, we have to think about what employment law changes might occur over the next 2 years if UK voters decide, on 23 June 2016,  to “leave” rather than “remain”, when answering the question:  "Should the UK remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?". However just saying:  “The following laws don’t apply any more” isn’t a practical option. The reasons are that unpicking 40+ years of jointly developed...

Zero Hours, Zero Tolerance? There has been unease for some time over the use by employers of a "zero hours contract". Now, for the first time, employees and workers working under these contracts have some proper redress against employers who try to enforce provisions aimed at prohibiting their zero hour employees or workers from working for other people. The term "zero hours contract" is used to cover various types of flexible or informal working arrangements.  Typically however it refers to a contract where...

Private emails at work - the latest twist “Furtive” is how many employers feel when they look at the private emails of a staff member who is the subject of a disciplinary investigation. The reason is the tension between an employer’s wish to check on what their employees are doing, and what those employees regard as their right to privacy,  even when using a work-related email account for private messaging. This tension was illustrated by the recent case of - Barbulescu v Romania...

Have faith - final warnings are useful. They are easily given, difficult to appeal and can be relied on.  A tribunal can't generally look behind a final warning and if an employee with a final warning steps out of line again, even in a relatively minor way, they can legitimately be dismissed for misconduct. But what happens if the final warning was given in bad faith?  Surely, the process is unfair? The answer is:  yes, it is. However it took two appeals and for the...